2016 Programme

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The Better Way: new strategies to manage your risks,
protect your business and enhance your brand reputation

 

 

9.30 - 10.00  Registration

 

10.00 - 10.10  Welcome and overview

David Richardson, Vice President EMEA, NSF International

 

10.10 – 10.15  Chairperson’s introduction

Sheila Dillon, international journalist and broadcaster

 

10.15 – 10.45  The power of technology to change the face of the food industry

Nigel Gifford OBE, far flung foodie, aeronautical engineer, inventor and entrepreneur

 

 

BRAND CHALLENGES

 

10.45 – 11.10  Consumer trends and expectations

Fraser McKevitt, Head of Retail and Consumer Insight, Kantar Worldpanel

 

 

11.10 – 11.30 BREAK

 

 

11.30 – 11.55  International crime: Interpol’s initiatives to combat food fraud

Francoise Dorcier, Criminal Intelligence Officer, INTERPOL

 

11.55 – 12.20  Prevention through prediction: horizon scanning and predictive analytics

Jude Mason, Director, Consulting and Technical Services, NSF International

 

12.20 – 12.45  Discussion, questions and comments

 

 

12.45 – 14.00  LUNCH

 

 

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITIES

 

14.00 – 14.25  The role of big data and data sharing in food safety

Guy Poppy, Chief Scientific Adviser, Food Standards Agency

 

14.25 – 14.50  The relevance and impact of sustainability for corporate social responsibility

Aris Vrettos, Programme Director, University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) Cambridge University

 

14.50 – 15.15  Achieving and evidencing responsible sourcing

Simon Davis, Agriculture and Sustainability Development Manager, NSF International

 

 

15.15 – 15.35 BREAK

 

 

IMMEDIATE CHALLENGES

 

15.35 – 16.00  EU regulatory developments and external impacts on the industry

Dominic Watkins, partner, DWF law firm

 

16.00 – 16.30  How to develop an integrated strategy – discussion.

 

 

CLOSE

 

16.30 – 17.30  Drinks reception

 

 

 

9.30  Registration

 

10.00   Welcome and overview

David Richardson, Vice President EMEA, NSF International

 

10.10  Chairperson’s introduction

Sheila Dillon, international journalist and broadcaster

 

10.15  The power of technology to change the face of the food industry

Nigel Gifford OBE, far flung foodie, aeronautical engineer, inventor and entrepreneur

 

Drawing on his unique combination of skills and his renowned gift for communication, Nigel will address this audience on the new technologies in which he is involved and their many potential applications to the food industry.

 

He will explain the power of disruptive technologies and how his own work and inventions

can play important roles in human connectivity, economic development, food security, early weather warnings,

crop production and monitoring - potentially in ways that could change  the face of many industries and how they interface. Nigel will also unveil the first public details of Pouncer™ and other skunk work*developments relevant to your organisations’ global interests. Currently under wraps it is likely to cause major headlines across the world.

 

* ‘Skunk works’ is a term widely used in business, engineering, and some technical fields to describe a group of people with a high degree of autonomy who are unhampered by bureaucracy, and work  on critical, advanced or secret projects.

 

 

BRAND CHALLENGES

 

10.45  Consumer trends and expectations

Fraser McKevitt, Head of Retail and Consumer Insight, Kantar Worldpanel

 

Consumers and shoppers can confuse the unwary, as they can hold so many seeming contradictory positions at the same time. On the one hand health has never been such a motivator, yet obesity continues to increase. In many markets, such as the UK, shoppers are voting with their feet and wallets for the discount supermarkets, yet most brands know that genuinely justifying a premium is a great route to sustained success. Interest in food, through the filter of television seems to be at an all-time high, yet the amount of time the average consumer spends cooking is falling.

Kantar Worldpanel’s continuously recorded panel data observes and records what people actually do, not just what they say. In his presentation Fraser will draw out the really important trends that everyone involved in FMCG needs to understand, and help resolve the paradox that is the modern consumer.

 

 

11.10 – 11.30 BREAK

 

 

11.30  International crime: Interpol’s initiatives to combat food fraud

Francoise Dorcier, Criminal Intelligence Officer, INTERPOL

 

INTERPOL is the largest international police organization with 190 member countries. Its role is to facilitate cross-border police cooperation, support its member countries to prevent and combat international crime.

 

INTERPOL has set up an operational platform called Operation OPSON which is jointly coordinated by INTERPOL and Europol. Its objective is to seize counterfeit/substandard food /beverages and to dismantle the organized crime groups involved in this trafficking. Trafficking knows no boundaries, which makes the role of international police organizations key in preventing and curbing this trafficking. In addition to removing potential harmful products form the market, OPSON is designed to facilitate the cooperation between law enforcement agencies and regulatory bodies, enhance the collaboration with the private sector and facilitate the exchange of information at an international level.

 

Starting in 2011 with 10 countries, the fourth edition of Operation OPSON included the participation of 47 member countries from Africa, America, Asia, Europe and in the Middle East.

 

 

11.55 Prevention through prediction: horizon scanning and predictive analytics

Jude Mason, Director, Consulting and Technical Services, NSF International

 

The phenomenon of accelerated change in technology, communications and many other areas, combined with globalisation and an increasing number of disruptive events with extensive implications, mean that the issues facing food businesses and their supply chains today are numerous, complex, fast moving and sometimes hard to predict. Horizon scanning and predictive analytics have become important tools to help businesses understand and prioritise the issues and use the information proactively to build resilience and capitalise on opportunities.

 

Horizon scanning has many different benefits across the organisation including strategy and policy planning, risk mitigation, innovation and new product development, competitive advantage, resource management and more.

 

Jude explains how these techniques work, the benefits they bring, and shows how businesses can develop and operate within a strategic framework that enables a systematic and more effective approach to food safety and brand protection.

 

12.20 – 12.45  Discussion, questions and comments

 

 

12.45 – 14.00  LUNCH

 

 

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITIES

 

14.00  The role of big data and data sharing in food safety

Guy Poppy, Chief Scientific Adviser, Food Standards Agency

 

Today’s increasingly complex food systems bring both benefits and risks to our daily lives and high quality, independent science is required to allow government and consumers to make informed decisions, especially at a time when food security and food costs are becoming increasingly debated. One of the challenges is how to adopt an overarching systems approach to food security, making sure that the basis for risk management decisions, and the information and analysis used, is clear, rational and justifiable. Agencies across all European states need to be consistent in their approaches and to meet common, essential criteria.

 

In his presentation, Professor Poppy talks about the huge amount of data already collected by government agencies and industry in Europe. He considers how public and private data sharing might work and how information can be gained from this about emerging food safety problems. He highlights potential exciting public health data analysis projects together with research institutes, universities and the private sector.

 

 

14.25  The relevance and impact of sustainability for corporate social responsibility

Aris Vrettos, Programme Director, University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) Cambridge University

 

Despite notable progress in corporate sustainability approaches few companies have developed a coherent strategy to address the complex set of risks and opportunities arising from system pressures and the transition to a sustainable economy. Those looking to manage their impacts and critical dependencies are finding that business-as-usual brand and sustainability strategies based on internal objectives and activities are failing to address resource security, costs and disruptions and reputational risks, for example. The answer lies in better understanding the interconnected operating environment and how to manage issues- not symptoms- at the system level, working with peers and other stakeholders across and beyond the value chain to identify new material priorities. Effective interventions for resilience and business value channel capital and innovation capacity towards new models of value creation that incorporate sustainable consumption and production and grow the capability and incentives to act.

 

 

14.50  Achieving and evidencing responsible sourcing

Simon Davis, Agriculture and Sustainability Development Manager, NSF International

 

Global sustainability issues such as caused by climate change, intensive farming, water and energy waste, combined with other social and ethical issues that go way beyond the sphere of food safety, now present the most substantial and growing risks to business; and in today’s complex and long supply networks, the issues are myriad, interrelated and often lack visibility. Sourcing product responsibly is one of the key ways to mitigate your business risks and make both your supply chain and your business more resilient to failure of supply through catastrophic or unforeseen events, or incidents that could cause a devastating loss of consumer or stakeholder confidence.

 

Simon Davis of NSF explains how to build and implement a strategy for responsible sourcing, with the twin goals of making your ingredients and product supply chains resilient for the future; and how to put in place the robust processes and systems that enable you to measure and monitor progress towards your goals.

 

 

15.15 – 15.35 BREAK

 

 

IMMEDIATE CHALLENGES

 

15.35  EU regulatory developments and external impacts on the industry

Dominic Watkins, partner, DWF law firm

 

The food industry has undergone seismic regulatory change in the last decade against a backdrop of price deflation and tighter margins.  Through that lens we explore what is next.  What will the impacts of the next phase of the food information requirements coming into force be and do we really need more change?   Dominic will offer some reality and balance on TTIP and the other free trade agreements being finalised at present and ask would more international harmonisation be a good thing.  Closer to home, with almost all of our regulation coming from the EU it is not too early to start asking what the impact would be on business and planning for which ever outcome becomes a reality.  Against this backdrop he will  identify some of the key considerations for 2016.

 

 

16.00  How to develop an integrated strategy – discussion.

 

 

CLOSE

 

16.30 – 17.30  Drinks reception

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Full Programme