9.00  REGISTRATION AND COFFEE

 

9.30  WELCOME

 

9.40  THE FUTURE OF FOOD

Serban Teodoresco and David Edwards, NSF International

Serban and David will take a top line view of the issues that they believe will shape food safety policies and practice in the next 10 years… more

2015 Programme

Select a seminar from the list

to read more detail.

10.05  FOOD SECURITY – traditional and modern methods of food production and their implications

Alan McHughen, University of California

Increasing food demand globally is placing considerable stress on the resources required to fulfil such demand.
GM provides an answer but can resistance be overcome?… more

10.20  THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA FOR PREDICTING TRENDS

Heidi Myers, Meltwater

Heidi explains the importance of Social Listening in the food hygiene and retail industry and the future of Big Data in 2015 and beyond… more

10.45  NETWORK ANALYSIS AND THE RASFF DATABASE, ITS POWER AND POTENTIAL

Professor Declan Naughton, Kingston University

Declan introduces an exciting network analysis tool being used with the RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Feed and Food) database, informing risk analysis and preparation for emerging issues in a global framework… more

11.10  TEA & COFFEE BREAK

 

11.30  THE LEGISLATIVE FUTURE AND TRENDS

Dominic Watkins, DWF

Dominic presents some of the key changes impacting the food industry from a legislative point of view and in light of this how businesses can act to manage their risk and reputation… more

11.55  THE EUROPEAN AND POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE

Robert Condon and George Lyon, Hume Brophy

Robert and George explain how public affairs campaigns are executed in the UK and Europe, and present a case study on the EU’s response to the horsemeat scandal in 2013 and its impact on consumer perceptions… more

 

12.20  PANEL DEBATE AND QUESTIONS

12.45  LUNCH BREAK

 

13.45  FOOD FRAUD AND THE ELLIOTT REPORT, THE FSA RESPONSE

John Barnes, FSA

John provides an update on the FSA and UK local authorities’ response following the horsemeat incident in 2013 and the FSA’s response to the Elliott Review… more

14.10  FOOD FRAUD AWARENESS AND DETECTION IN YOUR BUSINESS

Lisa Jack, Portsmouth University

Lisa explains how food fraud is an economic crime which can be tracked by ‘following the money’, through paperwork and audit trails and using forensic accounting skills… more

14.35  THE LATEST FRAUD DETECTION AND PREVENTION MODELS AND TOOLS

Carole Payne, NSF strategic consultant

Carole introduces NSF International’s holistic 7-step approach to detecting and preventing fraud in your business and supply chain… more

15.00  TESTING AND ANALYSIS STRATEGIES TO MITIGATE RISK AND DETECT FOOD FRAUD

Alison Johnson, Food Forensics

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure….how testing strategies can inform, mitigate and monitor business food fraud risk… more

15.25  TEA & COFFEE BREAK

 

15.40  PRODUCT RECALL PLANNING AND PREPARATION FROM AN INSURER’S PERSPECTIVE

Andrew Redman, AIG

How does an Insurer assess the readiness of a food & beverage industry company for a crisis recall event and how can an Insurer assist companies both pre and post such an event?... more

16.05  EMERGENCY PLANNING AND EXERCISE

Beverley Osborne, T4R

Are you ready?  Can your organisation detect, prevent and, if necessary withstand, handle and recover from a disruptive challenge, whatever the cause? The first step to becoming resilient is training and preparation… more

16.30  PANEL DEBATE AND QUESTIONS

 

17.00  CLOSE

 

17.00 – 18.00 DRINKS RECEPTION

9.00  REGISTRATION AND COFFEE

 

9.30  Welcome – Sheila Dillon, Chairperson and David Richardson, Vice President EMEA, NSF International Food Division.

 

9.40  THE FUTURE OF FOOD

Serban Teodoresco and David Edwards, NSF International

Serban and David will take a top line view of the issues that they believe will shape food safety policies and practice in the next 10 years…

 

They will identify and expand on a number of emerging developments that they believe to be important, including the disturbing implications of the current focus on food fraud, the recognition of corporate culture as a key factor in preventing fraud and nanotechnology – potentially the new GM in consumer eyes.

 

 

10.05  FOOD SECURITY – traditional and modern methods of food production and their implications

Alan McHughen, University of California

Increasing food demand globally is placing considerable stress on the resources required to fulfil such demand.
GM provides an answer but can resistance be overcome?

 

Human population increases and dietary aspirations, compounded by diminishing natural resources and greater concern for environmental sustainability, makes the provision of safe, affordable food produced in an environmentally and economically sustainable manner a formidable challenge.

Biotechnology, especially GM, is a controversial tool able to help meet the challenge for safe, affordable and sustainably produced food, but is met with resistance in some areas. Fortunately, science has provided at least some answers to address the concerns over safe and sustainable applications of biotechnology in agriculture.

 

 

10.20  THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA FOR PREDICTING TRENDS

Heidi Myers, Meltwater

Heidi explains the importance of Social Listening in the food hygiene and retail industry and the future of Big Data in 2015 and beyond…

 

In today's world, we are all immersed and often overwhelmed by data. From social media to online news - the internet holds unlimited information that, if we could channel, would make our lives easier and allow us to make informed decisions for our businesses and industries. But how good are we at monitoring and listening to this data? No one is superhuman, so how can we take it and make it manageable?

 

 

10.45  NETWORK ANALYSIS AND THE RASFF DATABASE, ITS POWER AND POTENTIAL

Professor Declan Naughton, Kingston University

Declan introduces an exciting network analysis tool being used with the RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Feed and Food) database, informing risk analysis and preparation for emerging issues in a global framework…

 

Advanced data analysis can provide a powerful and cost-effective approach to gather intelligence from existing food safety records, complementing the current approaches to food safety via a number of routes, including identifying the underlying structure and relationships between various stakeholders, informing sampling/testing decisions and developing both risk analyses and preparations for emerging issues.  A unique bespoke network analysis tool can deliver a wide range of benefits covering key aspects of food safety.

 

Declan describes the development of a unique bespoke network analysis tool which has been produced to assist with data mining from food safety databases. The user-friendly tool has the power to easily digest enormous amounts of data, it allows facile interrogation of large databases to reduce complexity and generate instantaneous reports with a focus on the interaction between countries as detectors and/or transgressors, identifying and supplying contaminated foods respectively.

 

 

11.10  TEA & COFFEE BREAK

 

 

11.30  THE LEGISLATIVE FUTURE AND TRENDS

Dominic Watkins, DWF

Dominic presents some of the key changes impacting the food industry from a legislative point of view and in light of this how businesses can act to manage their risk and reputation…

 

He reflects on new and upcoming legislation including the EU Food Information for Consumers Regulation (FIC), and what we might see post the Elliott Review.

 

Tough new sentencing guidelines are expected, what will be the impact of the new guidelines on business?

In light of all this, what can businesses do to manage their risk and reputation and… what else might be on the horizon?

 

 

11.55  THE EUROPEAN AND POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE

Robert Condon and George Lyon, Hume Brophy

Robert and George explain how public affairs campaigns are executed in the UK and Europe, and present a case study on the EU’s response to the horsemeat scandal in 2013 and its impact on consumer perceptions…

 

Robert introduces the Hume Brophy agri-food team and explains how EU and domestic public affairs campaigns can be executed in parallel, using the examples of Monsanto and Tate and Lyle Sugars amongst others.

 

George will then present a case study on the EU’s response to the horsemeat scandal in 2013. He will offer some ‘insider insight’ into how the scandal emerged, how it was initially dealt with by the European institutions and crucially what impact it has had in relation to consumer perceptions about Europe’s food industry and the longer term fight against food fraud.

 

 

12.20  PANEL DEBATE AND QUESTIONS

 

 

12.45  LUNCH BREAK

 

 

13.45  FOOD FRAUD AND THE ELLIOTT REPORT, THE FSA RESPONSE

John Barnes, FSA

John provides an update on the FSA and UK local authorities’ response following the horsemeat incident in 2013 and the FSA’s response to the Elliott Review…

 

John outlines the action taken by the FSA and UK local authorities since the horsemeat incident in early 2013 and the FSA’s response to the subsequent publication of the Elliott Review into the Integrity and Assurance of the Food Supply Networks, in September 2014.

 

 

14.10  FOOD FRAUD AWARENESS AND DETECTION IN YOUR BUSINESS

Lisa Jack, Portsmouth University

Lisa explains how food fraud is an economic crime which can be tracked by ‘following the money’, through paperwork and audit trails and using forensic accounting skills…

 

Food fraud is an economic crime and detecting food fraud is as much about following the money as it is about diagnostic testing.  The clues are in the surrounding systems, the paperwork and your supply network partners. It also follows that to protect your business against food fraud, you need to consider the management controls, audit trails and due diligence that you undertake.  There are also skills to be learned from forensic accounting about listening and asking the right questions.  At University of Portsmouth Business School and the Centre for Counter Fraud studies, we look at food fraud as fraud and investigate the factors that make it profitable.  We teach companies how to build resilience to fraud and to reduce the cost of fraud to their business.

 

 

14.35  THE LATEST FRAUD DETECTION AND PREVENTION MODELS AND TOOLS

Carole Payne, NSF strategic consultant

Carole introduces NSF International’s holistic 7-step approach to detecting and preventing fraud in your business and supply chain…

 

NSF 7-step fraud awareness, detection and prevention process combines expert consulting with our proprietary models and analytical tools, science- and sector-based expertise, laboratory testing facilities, training, supply chain assurance and certification services.

 

 

15.00  TESTING AND ANALYSIS STRATEGIES TO MITIGATE RISK AND DETECT FOOD FRAUD

Alison Johnson, Food Forensics

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure….how testing strategies can inform, mitigate and monitor business food fraud risk…

 

Food Fraud is organised crime; in any other industry sector it would be investigated, understood and driven out, so why is it still an ongoing issue in food and drink? What practical steps can be taken to reduce this risk within a business, protecting brands and putting consumers’ interest back at the heart of business ethics?

 

Beginning with the psychological barriers to dealing with fraud, Alison will consider, on a practical level, what businesses can actually do to manage their risk. She will suggest approaches for risk assessments and examples of how testing can be used as mitigation and monitoring tools, ultimately reducing and managing residual risk. The focus of this presentation is to put businesses back in control.

 

 

15.25  TEA & COFFEE BREAK

 

 

15.40  PRODUCT RECALL PLANNING AND PREPARATION FROM AN INSURER’S PERSPECTIVE

Andrew Redman, AIG

How does an Insurer assess the readiness of a food & beverage industry company for a crisis recall event and how can an Insurer assist companies both pre and post such an event?

 

What is the true cost to a client of a crisis event and what is the extent of coverage provided by the Insurance market today?

 

 

16.05  EMERGENCY PLANNING AND EXERCISE

Beverley Osborne, T4R

Are you ready?  Can your organisation detect, prevent and, if necessary withstand, handle and recover from a disruptive challenge, whatever the cause? The first step to becoming resilient is training and preparation…

 

By becoming resilient, we can prepare ourselves for the possibilities; react and respond in an appropriate way when things do happen; and consequently we can help to control the situation.  This session will look at the concepts of Emergency Planning training and exercising, and what steps we can take to improve our resilience at all levels.  After all, statistics show that nearly 1 in 5 business suffer a major disruption every year (according to the BCI) and in London, the Chamber of Commerce estimates that as many as 44% of SMEs in the capital have no contingency plans.  Your own plans may be in place – but have you checked your supplier’s arrangements recently?

 

 

16.30  PANEL DEBATE AND QUESTIONS

 

17.00  CLOSE

 

17.00 – 18.00 DRINKS RECEPTION

 

Full Programme